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Railway Walks & Explorations - Aston On Trent Tramway

A rough, illustrated, guide to the former Aston on Trent Tramway - and what it looks like today.

By clicking the icon in the top left of the map window, you can select/deselect other options to view or click the icon top right to view full screen.

The Flickr photos for this map are also viewable HERE.

The tramway route is shown in orange and my circular walk in green .
You can right-click and download my walk GPX file here for use in your GPS, Sat Nav or phone mapping.

The route is easy walking throughout and a public footpath where I have shown. Unfortunately the end of the tramway in Aston ended in what is now private pasture and the wharf end is also now private access to a fishing pond. However, the wharf site is visible from the publically walkable canal towpath opposite. Access is from a public bridlepath down a lane a short distance west from the circular route shown.

I have found a number of websites with more information on the railway and its history. The following are just samples.
Follow these links for further information:- All links should open in a new tab.

For a historic map of the route, follow this link and then adjust the transparency on the slider scale to view the present day appearance:
Click Here for Historic Map

The best starting point is probably to park in the village centre - which is convenient for both pubs and shops.

This website http://www.astonontrenthistory.org.uk/history.php?series=201803141521059694 has some history of the tramway and gypsum workings.

I have struggled to find much information about this tramway - much less any photographs - but a little more can be gleaned from the last paragraph here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weston-on-Trent#The_railway - which, although it is from an entry about neighbouring Weston On Trent, does refer to the Aston tramway.

Otherwise, information is limited to that in 'Stone Blocks & Iron Rails', (Bertram Baxter, 1966, David & Charles, p176) which gives opening as 1813 but closure is unsure believed to have worked 'within living memory' in 1966.